by Matthew Thompson

weirdvintage: In the late 19th and early 20th century, the Spiritualism movement was all the rage, and people sought out mediums to communicate with spirits.   One of the most famous mediums of the day was Marthe Beraud (also known as Eva C. and Eva Carrière). In this photo, taken in 1912, she demonstrates a “light manifestation” between her hands, and a strange materialization upon her head.  She was debunked in 1922, much to the dismay of her supporter Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. (via)

weirdvintage:

In the late 19th and early 20th century, the Spiritualism movement was all the rage, and people sought out mediums to communicate with spirits.  

One of the most famous mediums of the day was Marthe Beraud (also known as Eva C. and Eva Carrière). In this photo, taken in 1912, she demonstrates a “light manifestation” between her hands, and a strange materialization upon her head.  She was debunked in 1922, much to the dismay of her supporter Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. (via)

by Matthew Thompson

atlasobscura:

Relics of the World’s Fair: Chicago

From exploring what remains of the World’s Fair in Paris, we continue in our World’s Fair series by looking at what survives from the fairs in Chicago. The Windy City sports relics from just two World’s Fairs — compared to the six in Paris — but they’re two of the most famous fairs in history, with many relics.

For the full photo gallery of the Relics of Chicago’s World’s Fairs, keep going to Atlas Obscura…